Current Research

The Laboratory of Nanotechnology at George Mason University focuses on the synthesis and applications of a wide range of carriers at the nano and micron-size scale including polymeric and metallic particles, micelles, liposomes, carbon nanotubes and metal-organic frameworks. At the fundamental level, we aim to understand the mechanisms involved in the formation of such carriers to acquire high control in their physicochemical properties. At the applied level, we use those carriers in drug delivery, vaccines, imaging, biodefense, agriculture, medical devices and microelectronics projects. Because the development of carriers has been greatly accelerated in recent years, many multi-hybrid carriers have been emerged. Such development in carriers opens up new scientific, technical and clinical opportunities while posing challenges at different levels. For example, we are able to perform multiple tasks at the same time using multi-hybrid carriers. Also, using multi-hybrid systems we are able to accomplish tasks that could not been possible to achieve using monophasic carriers. However, the complexity of the morphology, physical and chemical properties of such carriers presents challenges in synthesis and batch control. Our lab aims to address carefully these issues to be able to use these carriers effectively in medical and industrial settings. Since our research projects are highly translational we collaborate closely with hospitals, industries, federal research laboratories and FDA in the Washington metropolitan area.

Fundamental Science

  • Coloidal Chemistry
  • Polymer Chemistry
  • Molecular Dynamic Simulations
  • Computational Fluid Dynamic Simulations
  • Cancer Biology of Solid Tumors: MD Resistance

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Applied Science

  • Cancer Theranostics
  • Photoacoustic Molecular Probes
  • Vaccines

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Point of Core

  • Diagnostic Tools
  • Therapeutics for breast, ovarian cancer and inflammatory diseases

Translational Research

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protein-protein interaction